What brought you to Brave?

windows

#44

Last first: in W-7 installations, I use multiple browsers (e.g.: IE and Chrome rarely; Brave, Firefox, Opera, and Vivaldi more frequently), each, for different on-line activity, reserving one browser (my choice is Vivaldi) for on-line banking and related financial transactions.

I heard about Brave and first installed an early version in late 2016 / early 2017 because of privacy and ad-blocking.

Barriers to Brave being my primary browser: First, lack of user control over updating. For me, that’s a non-negotiable Fail. It isn’t even open to discussion. I continue to use Brave, but only for non-essential activity. Second, while the concept of micro-payments to fund website publishers in lieu of advertising is appealing, use of cryptocurrency is also a non-negotiable Fail. Cryptocurrency as an option? Sure! But conventional modes of payment (e.g.: credit cards, electronic funds transfers) must be available.


#45

Like? No adds, uncomplicated, secure.
Brought me to Brave? A massive spam attack. on home phone, mobile, SMS, emails, premium SMS services unsolicited and billed. Google Add popped up and I accidentally clicked on it.
I searched for an ad blocker and some one recommended Brave when I read reviews for a popular adblocker.
Where did I come from? I enjoyed Google 2012-2017. They have changed. multiple multi national adds all over the desktop.
I enjoyed the experience of using Firefox on Asus notebook. Gnome/debian.
2010/2011


#46

I came to Brave because I heard Brendan Eich was behind it. I was a Firefox enthusiast until they ousted him for the “crime” of having a differing political view from theirs. Apparently the Left has gone from their “Make love, not war” hippie thing to acting like Orwell’s 1984 was meant to be an instruction manual.

I still have Firefox and use it only from time to time till I can figure out how to copy/paste in Brave (or maybe I’ll never be able to?). It gives me pleasure every time I open it and see the popup “Firefox is not currently your default browser” asking me if I want to go back, and I get to say NO. Ha.


#47

I heard about Brave and first installed an early version in late 2016 / early 2017. I like Brave because of privacy and ad-blocking.

I use multiple browsers in W-7 installations (IE and Chrome rarely; Brave, Firefox, Opera, and Vivaldi more frequently), each, for different genres of on-line activity. Firefox is my primary browser and I reserve one browser (my choice is Vivaldi) for on-line banking and other financial transactions.

Barriers to Brave being my primary browser? There’s only one: Brave users can’t control updating. For me, updating that I don’t / can’t control is a non-negotiable Fail. It isn’t even open to discussion. In many operational scenarios, I never open Brave.

Micro-payments to fund website publishers in lieu of advertising is appealing, but use of cryptocurrency is also a non-negotiable Fail. Cryptocurrency as an option? Yes! But conventional modes of payment (e.g.: credit cards, electronic funds transfers) must be available for those who, at this moment, avoid cryptocurrency.

Beyond uncontrolled updating and no alternatives to cryptocurrency, there are multiple (and multiplying) unresolved bugs. This is understandable albeit irritating considering that Brave is free and still very much in development.

I’ll continue to use Brave, but only for non-essential activity.


#48

Saw it in a Youtube video. I had heard of it before in news and such but I thought that it was just another browser that didn’t really offer much. Then I heard who made it, who partnered with it, and what it did. Now I like it better than anything else!


#49

I came to brave after learning and buying some BAT tokens
They seem to be trading quite well now https://www.coingecko.com/en/coins/basic-attention-token

Like the metamask in it room but when will bat be fully supported in brave? Excite


#50

Trying to get away from the Google monopoly. I went from Chrome to Firefox to Opera, and now finally to here. I don’t see myself going anywhere.


#51

I was a very heavy user of Firefox. What brought me over to Brave was the simplicity of ad blocking, privacy and all that jazz instead of having to have several addons and then micro manage options in FireFox.

Took some getting used to, but in the end very happy with Brave that I have made it my default browser now.

Just minor problems to iron out such as Google Captcha click pics of cars does not work in Brave and 4chan not enlarging images when I click it as it is somehow an ad despite being user uploaded.


#52

What brought me to Brave and have me make it my main browser:

Blending in with the crowd;

Researching browser fingerprinting I found most of the data is obtained by querying your browser, the number of extensions, the installed extensions, browser settings etc… Unlike other browsers with Brave most of what you need to be secure is built in extension wise, there is very little customization and settings. So there is little difference between Brave users compared to Chrome, Fire Fox or other browsers with a lot of customization so Brave users have a more generic fingerprint thus harder to identify and track.

This more this browser user base grows the larger the crowd to blend into.

I think the new Private tab with Tor and this more generic fingerprinting puts Brave second only to the Tor Browser in privacy and security.

I love the ability to adjust security levels on a per site basis.

I also love the BAT idea and have been inquiring on some of my favorite sites if they accept these coins.