Questions from new user, privacy vs advertising

privacy
tor
#1

I am new to Brave and have a few questions.

  1. There seems to be somewhat of a conflict with Brave. On one hand, there is a lot of mention of privacy and the new Tor private window (I understand that is beta), while on the other side there is a fairly large focus on advertising/rewards/contributor/etc. Most of us can recall that most great internet services and products were destroyed as it relates to privacy due to the introduction of advertising revenues. I can see the approach as I understand it is different here, but i question the ability to maintain a best-in-class privacy centered browser while incorporating the commercial side.

  2. There is an inherent concern using derivatives of browsers. Others in this class with Brave include Pale Moon, Vivaldi and Opera to make my statement clear. One of those concerns that makes a lot of sense to me is a comparison of resources. While the larger names such as Chrome and Firefox have large groups of contributors, the derivatives have smaller groups while relying on the larger for their core. As a Linux user, I see very often issues with delays on updates to distro repositories, noting that security updates do have a higher level of urgency. How does the Brave team handle Chromium updates on a regular basis, and how are more urgent security updates handled, if differently? Such as … are updates able to simply pass through to Brave without team intervention (aside from testing) or do updates need incorporating to the Brave derivative?

  3. I am a bit unclear on where Brave is intending to position itself. With options available such as the Tor local service, the Tor Browser Bundle (TBB) and Whonix over VirtualBox that allow the host to remain without a reboot, does Brave intend to compete with such other options or is the intent to be a more secure version of a standard/daily use browser like Chrome and Firefox? I understand that competing with Whonix is not so realistic, but competing with TBB does not seem far off.

2 Likes
#2

Hello,

Happy to help.

There seems to be somewhat of a conflict with Brave. On one hand, there is a lot of mention of privacy and the new Tor private window (I understand that is beta), while on the other side there is a fairly large focus on advertising/rewards/contributor/etc. Most of us can recall that most great internet services and products were destroyed as it relates to privacy due to the introduction of advertising revenues. I can see the approach as I understand it is different here, but i question the ability to maintain a best-in-class privacy centered browser while incorporating the commercial side.

Brave is differentiating by creating advertising that’s private, by design. This means using new protocols for accounting, and changing the flow of advertising to ensure that people’s browsing and personal information never leaves the device. We’re the first company to deliver private ads, to the same high standard for privacy that we apply to our product.

There is an inherent concern using derivatives of browsers. Others in this class with Brave include Pale Moon, Vivaldi and Opera to make my statement clear. One of those concerns that makes a lot of sense to me is a comparison of resources. While the larger names such as Chrome and Firefox have large groups of contributors, the derivatives have smaller groups while relying on the larger for their core. As a Linux user, I see very often issues with delays on updates to distro repositories, noting that security updates do have a higher level of urgency. How does the Brave team handle Chromium updates on a regular basis, and how are more urgent security updates handled, if differently? Such as … are updates able to simply pass through to Brave without team intervention (aside from testing) or do updates need incorporating to the Brave derivative?

Brave keeps up to date with the latest version of Chromium, and puts a lot of energy into ensuring that we’re on the latest version of Chromium to ensure we have the current security patches/updates, etc. Security is a high priority for Brave. In addition to staying up to date with Chromium, we have a security bounty program through hackerone, and upgrade any connections for the user to https by default, whenever possible.

I am a bit unclear on where Brave is intending to position itself. With options available such as the Tor local service, the Tor Browser Bundle (TBB) and Whonix over VirtualBox that allow the host to remain without a reboot, does Brave intend to compete with such other options or is the intent to be a more secure version of a standard/daily use browser like Chrome and Firefox? I understand that competing with Whonix is not so realistic, but competing with TBB does not seem far off.

Brave is mainstreaming privacy, security and token utility in a private, rewards-based browser. People are in control of their data, and choose when they want to share their information. The existing internet is basically opt-out. Brave is flipping the script to create conditions that allow for an opt-in Internet experience.

If you’re a mainstream user, and we’re doing our job, Brave “just works” and is fast, private and secure. Mainstream users don’t need a crash course in privacy or utility tokens, the browser just has to work, be fast, private and reward people for their attention (if people choose to opt-in to rewards).

Hope that this helps!

1 Like
#3

Thanks for the reply. Most all is addressed, but I do have some further question.

If I interpret your reply correctly, there is no intent to compete with products like Whonix, which makes sense. You are offering a “just works” solution. How do you position yourself in relation to the TBB, realizing the long term objectives with Brave in relation to its Tor integrations? Meaning that once you consider the Tor aspect of Brave to be “stable”, is it your belief that Brave in the Tor private mode will be a competitor to TBB?

The reason for my detailed interest in that area is that things get more complex for users in a competition type environment. When a user only has 2-3 options, it is very feasible to simply install all of the 2-3 options and be a user of all of them utilizing their advantages as needed. Problem is that not only do users have 3 core browsers to choose from (IE/Edge, Firefox and Chromium), but there are also numerous derivatives of each (not so much IE/Edge) to choose from. So for example, I can have Chrome and Firefox installed as standard/base browsers as I need to sometimes use Chrome or Firefox specifically to deal with compatibility issues. Then I might need security and install Whonix on VirtualBox or use a Tails DVD. Yet in more addition, I have a need for a secure browsing where I might look at products like Brave, TBB and Opera … which again all have advantages and disadvantages as well as compatibility differences.

I hope my query makes sense. It is hard to make clear in short typed words vs a face to face conversation a list of specific questions when it is more of a larger compound question.